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  • Ennio Morricone, Italian composer most famous for Westerns, dies aged 91

  • According to Italian news agency Ansa, he died in hospital having fractured his femur in a fall some days ago.

(CNB News) – Ennio Morricone, the Italian composer whose credits include the “spaghetti” Westerns that made Clint Eastwood a star, created the coyote-howl theme for “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” and produced more than 400 original scores for feature films, has died in Rome aged 91

According to Italian news agency Ansa, he died in hospital having fractured his femur in a fall some days ago.

The prolific Italian film composer also wrote music for Once Upon a Time in America, The Untouchables and Cinema Paradiso. Having received an honorary Oscar in 2007, he went on to win one in 2016 for Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight.

Morricone, who was simply known as “Maestro” in his home town of Rome, scored more than 500 films over seven decades.

Ennio Morrione remains best known for the haunting melodies he wrote for the trilogy of 1960s westerns Sergio Leone made with the then little-known Eastwood.

A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly centred around Eastwood’s taciturn gunslinger, known as “The Man With No Name”.

WHO IS ENNIO MARRIONE

Ennio Mrrione was Born in Rome on Nov. 10, 1928, Morricone was the oldest of the five children. His father was a trumpet player.

After studying trumpet and composition at the Conservatory of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in the Italian capital, he started working as a trumpeter and then as an arranger for record companies.

“I started working on very easy kinds of music pieces for the radio, for television and then for the theater, and then little by little I started to compose the film scores,” he told the AP in 2016.

In 1961 he wrote his first score for a movie, a bittersweet comedy set in the final moments of Fascism called “Il Federale” (known in English as “The Fascist”). That decade also saw Morricone cooperate with Pontecorvo, first on “The Battle of Algiers,” the black-and-white classic depicting the Algerian uprising against the French; and later on “Queimada,” a tale of colonialism starring Marlon Brando.

Morricone received his first Oscar nomination for original score with “Days Of Heaven,” a 1978 movie by U.S. director Terence Malick. Beside “The Hateful Eight,” the others were for “The Mission” (1986), “The Untouchables” (1987), “Bugsy” (1991) and “Malena” (2000).

Shortly before his lifetime Oscar, Morricone joked that he would have been happy without the coveted statuette, saying “I would have remained in the company of illustrious non-winners.”

But he also made no secret that he thought “The Mission,” with its memorably sweet theme of “Gabriel’s Oboe,” deserved the Academy Award. That year, he lost to Herbie Hancock’s “Round Midnight.”

Morricone had recently composed music to be performed in Genoa’s Carlo Felice Theater later this summer in honor of the 43 victims of that city’s 2018 Morandi Bridge collapse, Genoa Mayor Marco Bucci said. The music will be performed on the eve of a ceremony inaugurating the bridge’s replacement, the mayor said.

Highly versatile, Morricone also orchestrated Italian pop tunes that include enduring classics, like one version of an eternal summer hit, “Sapore di Sale” (“Taste of Salt”), which was written by famed Italian troubadour Gino Paoli.

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